Science Links/Lessons

  • Wild Kratts NEW!

    • Wild Kratts joins the adventures of Chris and Martin Kratt as they encounter incredible wild animals, combining science education with fun and adventure as the duo travels to animal habitats around the globe. Each adventure explores an age-appropriate science concept central to an animal's life and showcases a rarely seen wildlife moment, all wrapped up in engaging stories of adventure, mystery, rescue, and the Kratt brothers' brand of laugh-out-loud-comedy that kids love.

    • The educational goals of Wild Kratts are to:

    • 1) Teach six to eight-year-old viewers natural history and age-appropriate science by building on their natural interest in animals.

    • 2) Develop and strengthen basic skills of observation and investigation that children will use increasingly as they continue their study of science.

    • 3) Build excitement in science that will remain with them throughout their lives.

  • Studying the Solar System

    • How big is the sun? a short video that was released by Minute Physics. The video does a good job of putting the size of the sun into perspective that most students of middle school age or older should be able to understand.

    • The Scale of the Universe a huge selection of objects in the universe that are arranged according to size and scale. You can zoom-in on the image to objects as small as neutrinos and quarks or as large as planets, constellations, and galaxies. When you click on an object in The Scale of the Universe 2 a small window of information about that object pops up.

    • 3D Solar System Web features a narrated tour of the solar system beginning at the sun and working out through all of the planets. The tour explains the classifications of each planet, how long it takes each planet to orbit the sun, and each planet's unique features.

    • Magnifying the Universe an interactive infographic that allows you to see the size of atoms, animals, buildings, mountains, planets, stars, and galaxies in relation to other objects in the universe

    • 100,000 Stars  is a visualization of the 100,000 stars closest to Earth. You can view the stars on your own or take an automated tour of the stars. that also does a good job of helping viewers understand the scale of the universe

    • The Known Universe  a six minute video tour of the known universe that starts with Earth's biggest mountains in the Himalaya and zooms out from there

  • Science Kids   The home to tons of games and activities dealing with science and technology.  It includes experiments, fun facts, games, free activities, lesson plans, photos, quizzes, video, science fair projects and more!

  • PhET: Interactive Simulations for Science and Math  The University of Colorado at Boulder is a top place for finding science simulations to use in your classroom. These are fun, interactive, research-based simulations of physical phenomena from the PhET project at the University of Colorado

  • Kinetic City   This is a cool collection of an interactive activities, games, experiments, challenges and more.  It is a production of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • NASA Space Place   A great collection of games, animations, projects, and fun facts about Earth, space, and technology.  There are cool facts all over this website as well.  Do you know which famous astronauts birthday was on November 18, 1923? Alan B. Shepard, Jr.

  • Crickweb   So many interactive games, you could use a different one all school year long!  This UK-based website is mostly geared toward our younger learners, but you’re sure to find something for everyone.

  • SciShow Kids  YouTube video channel that produce educational content. SciShow Kids is geared towards younger students. Most videos are well under five minutes in length and prove great conversation starters before launching into a lesson. 

  • NASA Global Climate Change - Vital Signs of the Planet  (grades 6 - 12) is a go-to site for beautiful expert climate content. While it's mostly a reference site, the well-designed content is engaging enough to make the experience rich and approachable. Beginners can get only the facts, while advanced learners can dig deep into the dynamic data; everyone will enjoy the visuals. Images of Change allows students to compare satellite images of glaciers for evidence of warming, and geoscience data will help students master the NGSS performance expectations.

  • Earth Now (app for grades 6 - 12) As part of the NGSS Science and Engineering Practice "Analyzing and Interpreting Data," students need to work with real data sets to better construct arguments and make meaning. Earth-Now is a hub for current climate data obtained from Earth satellites. Through the app, students can manipulate color scales on a 3-D model of Earth and see up-to-date reports for air temperature, carbon dioxide, sea level, and other climate factors. Interpreting real evidence will help students make sense of potential global issues and can be a great supplemental tool in the classroom.

  • Climate Kids - NASA's eyes on the Earth (grades 3 - 6) Students don't need to wait until middle school to learn about climate change, so NASA has created a site that will appeal to young learners. Climate Kids tackles topics similar to those on its companion site, NASA Global Climate Change, but amps up the engagement through cartoons and games. In addition to digital content, Climate Kids has resources to get kids building and designing. The Climate Change Time Machine interactive allows students to travel through time and see mapped evidence of sea-ice and carbon-emission changes.

  • Children's University of Manchester  Animated Science lessons covering seven science subjects for students of early elementary/ primary school age. The lessons cover The Body and Medicine, Energy and Environment, The Earth and Beyond, Teeth and Eating, Micro-organisms, The Brain, and Exercise.

  • Habitats is a fun little game from the Smithsonian Science Education Center. The online game challenges elementary school students to match animals to their habitats. The game shows students images representative of four habitats; desert, coral reef, jungle, and marsh. Students drag pictures of animals from a list to their corresponding habitats. Students receive instant feedback on each move they make in the game. Once an animal has been placed in the correct habitat students can click on it to learn more about it in the Encyclopedia of Life.

  • Facts 4 Me an online reference tool for primary readers. Great information on many different type of animals; Ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome; Artists; Authors; Biomes; black history; Careers; Cities - US & World; Clouds; Colonial Life; Continents; Countries; Explorers; Famous People; Frontier Life; Holidays & Celebrations; Human Body; Inventions; Inventors; Landforms; Landmarks; Lewis & Clark Animals & Expeditions; Middle Ages; Musical Instruments; National Parks; Native Americans; National Wonders; Presidents; Revolutionary War; Rocks & Minerals; Simple Machines; Solar System; Space Exploration; Sports; States; Summer Olympics; Trees; Weather; What is...; Women; Wonders of the World. 

  • Eeko World Environment Awareness

  • Is Radiation Dangerous?  When we hear the word radiation, it’s tempting to picture huge explosions and frightening mutations. But that’s not the full story — radiation also applies to rainbows and a doctor examining an X-ray. So what is it, really, and how much should we worry about its effects?

  • What is Metallic Glass? Steel and plastic are essential to much of our infrastructure and technology. Steel is strong and hard, but difficult to shape intricately. Plastic can take on just about any form, but it’s weak and soft. Wouldn’t it be nice if there were one material as strong as the strongest steel and as shapeable as plastic? 

  • How Things Fly   STEM Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum. Features an interactive module in which students design their own airplanes. The activity starts with a simple and slow airplane that students have to modify until it reaches a target speed and altitude. As students modify the wings, fuselage, and engines of their airplanes they are given instant feedback on the effects of those modifications. In some cases the feedback includes the airplane crashing and the students having to start over again.

  • Google Camp   four week program designed for seven to ten year old children. Each week has its own theme. First week is Ocean Week, followed by Space Week, Nature Week and Music Week.

Updated February 3, 2018